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Max Planck And His Religious Belief (Part 1)

Max Planck, one of the most well-known scholars in the natural sciences, was born in the city of Kiel in Germany. After he became a professor, first he worked in Kiel, then in 1889, he became a member of the teaching staff at the University of Berlin. His activities in Berlin lasted for 30 years. He died in 1947.

Max Planck mostly dealt with radiation. His most important finding was that the energy rays coming out from atoms diffused in quanta. He called this finding the 'quantum theory,' and calculated the energy to be produced. A nobel prize for physicist was given to him in 1918 for his discovery.

Max Planck stated in his book (Der Strom von der Aufklärung bis zur Gegenwart) that: "Both religion and branches of science expose that there is an enormous Power which is unattainable. This Power created the world and keeps it under His sovereignty. However, their languages used in expressing this Power is different from each other. However, even though the methods of their explanations seem to be different, they originally are the same. These two explanations are not contrary to each other, but complement each other.

"Both religion and branches of science accept that this universe must have been created by a Power whose entity will never be understood, and which will never be attained by man. We cannot understand exactly the greatness of this enormous Power, and will never be able to understand it. Maybe, the tiniest part of His power might be understood indirectly by human beings.

"Religion uses reasonable symbols so that man can understand this Power, the Creator, and can approach Him. Branches of science use rules and formulas so that this Power can be known. If we unite these two ways, it will be clearly seen what a great power this Creator has. Therefore, His existence and greatness is expressed with the word Allah by religion, and with research, measurements and formulas by branches of science, which are a small field of this Power.