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What Breaks The Fast (Part 3)


It is written in Multaqa and in all other books that, "If the medicine put on a boil on one's head or body penetrates into one's brain or alimentary canal, one's fast breaks and only qada [1] becomes necessary." It is written in the explanation of Multaqa, "Imam-i-a'zam says that a fast breaks when food penetrates through the boil. But the two imams [2] say that it does not break because the fast breaks only when food goes in through the natural holes of one's body." Tahtawi explains this very well in his explanation of Maraqilfalah. He says, "If it is known that the liquid or solid medicine put on the boil on one's head or body has penetrated into one's brain or alimentary canal, one's fast breaks. If it is not known well that it has penetrated in, if the medicine is liquid one's fast breaks according to Imam-i-a'zam. But the two imams said that it does not break if it is not known for certain that the medicine has penetrated in. All three imams agreed that the fast does not break if the medicine which is not known for certain to have penetrated in is solid." Hence it is understood that all three imams said that the fast breaks when it is known for certain that the medicine has penetrated in, whether it is liquid or solid. This comes to mean that any inoculation or medical injection done with a syringe under the skin or in the muscles of one's arms, legs or any other part breaks the fast.

[1] qada': i) decree of a qadi (Muslim judge); ii) performance of an 'ibada after its due time.
[2] imam: i) profound 'alim; founder of a madhhab; ii) leader in congregational salat; iii) caliph.