Breadcrumbs

Formation Of The Mus-haf

Hadrat Jabrâil used to come once every year to recite the Qur'ân that had descended up to that moment according to its order in the Lawh-ul-mahfûz. And our master, the Prophet 'sall-Allâhu 'alaihi wa sallam', used to listen to it and repeat it. In the year when he (the Prophet 'sall-Allâhu 'alaihi wa sallam') would honour the Hereafter, Jabrâil 'alaihis-salâm' came twice, reciting the whole of it. Hadrat Muhammad 'sall-Allâhu 'alaihi wa sallam' and the majority of his Ashâb memorized the whole Qur'ân. Some of the Ashâb memorized some sections of it and wrote down most of its other sections. In the year when Hadrat Muhammad 'sall-Allâhu 'alaihi wa sallam' honoured the next world with his presence, Abû Bakr, the caliph, gathering those who knew it by heart and, uniting the written parts together, formed a committee to write down the whole of the Qur'ân on paper.

Thus, a book (a manuscript) called Mus-haf was formed. Thirty-three thousand Ashâb of the Prophet 'sall-Allâhu 'alaihi wa sallam' decided unanimously that each letter of the mushaf was precisely in its correct place. The sûras (chapters) were not separated. Hadrat Uthmân, the third caliph, separated the sûras from one another in 25 A. H. He put them in their order. After having six more mushafs written, he sent them to Bahrain, Damascus, Egypt, Baghdad, Kufa, Yemen, Mecca and Medina. The mushafs all over the world today have been multiplied by copying these seven. There is not even a point's difference amongst them.

There are one hundred and fourteen sûras and six thousand two hundred and thirty-six âyats in the Qur'ân al-kerîm. It is also reported that the number of âyats were sometimes more or less than 6,236, but these differences originate from the fact that one long âyat was considered several short âyats, or that a couple of short âyats were considered one long âyat, or that the Basmalas before the sûras were considered to be within the sûras (by some scholars) and to be independent âyats (by others).